Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN 13
CNN 4
CSPAN2 4
KGO (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
and the u.s. involvement. one of the headlines in "the washington times" -- "the rebels move towards tripoli." the baltimore sun" with libya facing questions. the public and congress question the u.s. involvement. in "the wall street journal" this morning "the u.s. will not back intervention." we continue our discussion with involving the u.s. and its involvement in the situation in libya, two words. coming up, "regime change." what should the u.s. mission be as the situation continues to develop in libya and whether or not regime change should be on that list. the numbers are -- host: if you have called in the last 30 days, send us a message electronically. the e-mail address is journal@c- span.org. among the items in the paper talking about u.s. and its involvement in the libyan situation is this op-ed piece by fred stevens in "the wall street journal." "bolivia mission was never about regime change -- the libyan mission was never about regime change." in this, he quotes gates. "the mission was never about regime change." the article goes on to say "does this mean the mission accomplished"
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
today taking out a libyan training jet and the u.s., france and britain all taking a lead role so far. but, but, but, just two arab jets are in the region along with two of their transport planes but we do not know if they are being used and no sign of the 24 jets promised and pulled by the united arab emirates and secretary of state, hillary clinton is satisfied but author of "the coming revolution," and expert on the middle east is not satisfied. these are the folks, the arab league that said to a nation, you have to do something about libya, we are behind you when you do, and they're not. what is going on? >>guest: that is the problem, the arab league asked the united nations and asked us and the europeans to intervene yet the arab league has huge resources. we are spending $100 million, i guess, each day on this operation and there are billions of petro dollars and more important you spoke about qatar with two planes are more and you have three other amendments that are allies, why were they not asked. >>neil: they were among the nations include will bahrain, algeria, egypt, jorda
for live coverage of the u.s. house. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. march 14, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable john campbell to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 5, 2011, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour, and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each. but in no event shall debate continue beyond 1:50 p.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from south carolina, mr. duncan, for one minute. mr. duncan: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to speak on behalf of
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
as an acting solicitor general in the mid-90s. he argued nine cases before the u.s. supreme court. the most by a solicitor general in more than 20 years. we also have ted olson who is a partner in gibson, done and crunchers from the washington d.c. office a member of the firm's executive committee and cochair of the appellate and constitutional law group. a former solicitor general of the united states, ted is one of the nation's premier appellate and u.s. supreme court advocates and he is argued dozens of cases before the court and i might add that both of them have contributed to north carolina victories in the u.s. supreme court and i thank them for that. the national association of attorney general is fortunate to have dan schweitzer is her supreme court counsel. his principle and very important responsibility to assist state appellate litigators who appear before the united states supreme court and he excels at his job. my thanks to all three of you for your time and for your expertise and i will turn it over to you. >> thank you general cooper. it is a pleasure and honor to be here to
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
to the streets in support of the international air campaign this. the u.s. commander in the region says the strikes protected the city from new government attacks and now says international forces are trying to extend the in fly zone to qaddafi's power center of tripoli. we have coverage of our new war on libya, jonathan hunt is on the opposition movement but first to rick leventhal in benghazi much the airstrikes aim to protecting other cities. is it working? >>reporter: well, we have seen the results, between benghazi and to the south where the jets, 95 percent of the missions carried out by u.s. fighter jets neutralizing tanks and heavy armored between here and the southern city 95 miles down the road. taking our thanks and artillery but in that town, qaddafi's army is in control with a major check point north and west of the city with tanks and heavy artillery. the rebels are being beaten back and the jets are not targeting those tanks and other positions because they're in the city limits so we did hear that there were airstrikes to our west. where the population has been taking a
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
terrorist attacks on the united states all done by people other than afghans. outraged at continuing u.s. military occupation of predominantly muslim countries. that's not to justify what they do, but it is to clarify the condition that we have in afghanistan. for how long are we going to continue to dedicate hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of lives before we realize we can't win afghanistan militarily? at the end of the year, the administration and u.s. military leaders were touting peace talks to end the war with high level taliban leaders. these leaders turned out to be fake. a november, 2010 article in "the new york times" detailed joint u.s. an afghan negotiations with a man the u.s. claim was one of the most senior commanders in the taliban. according to "the new york times" the episode underscores the uncertain and even bizarre nature of the atmosphere in which afghan and american leaders search for ways to bring the war to an end. leaders of the taliban are believed to be hiding in pakistan, possibly with the assistance of the pakistani government, which receives bi
for -- working for the u.s. government essentially, then the private side, those workers, it was incumbent upon them, what they asked for, they didn't want to ask for so much they were going to break the company they worked for because they'd be out of luck and out of a job, but the public side doesn't have that same kind of relationship. >> no. the relationship between the public sector worker union is with a politician on the other side of the negotiating fence. in the private sector, it's a private sector union person negotiating with a corporate boss for wages and benefits and pensions, and the two are very different. the corporation must rely on profits, the politician relies on the taxpayer and tax revenue. a very different kettle of fish, with very different outcomes as we can see today. martha: that's a tricky marriage, so to speak, as we watch this all unfold. stuart varney from the fox business network and varney & co. bill: back to this weather, flooding and tornadoes leaving a path of destruction in the midwest, we watched this live during our program yesterday. this is flooding in
, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we were to detect anything, we may detect things well below any levels that require action. we did
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
in the president's 129,000,002,012 budget for the u.s. the board of transportation designed as a first installment of the bold six year 556 billion reauthorization proposal the lowest relative level of domestic spending since president eisenhower was in office six decades ago. that was ten administrations ago. the simple fact is we have to cut and consolidate things that aren't growing the economy or making easier, making it easier to do business in order to pay for the things that are so the department of transportation, president obama's budget slashes red tape and consolidates more than 50 programs and includes reforms that will accelerate project delivery and in power local communities. of course our major of objective is to make investments and to mauro that expand economic opportunities today. to dream big and build big hit on the cover of the budget, there is a picture of a bridge that crosses the hoover dam, connect nevada and arizona. seven years ago or more people began planning for this bridge. and if it weren't for the big thinkers and the big builders of generations ago, we wouldn't h
carrying out any sort of no-fly zone resolution like the one that was passed yesterday. in terms of u.s. involvement, when you think of a no-fly zone, the first thing that comes to mind is american fighter pilots flying over foreign country. but the u.s. has many more ways that it could contribute to this effort. from folks i've been speaking to here in the building, there's also could be the possibility of unmanned drones being used in the area. the u.s. has signal jamming aircraft that could disrupt the communication between colonel gadhafi and some of his forces. they also have radar aircraft that could help coordinate some of the air traffic control if you had planes going out on no fly missions. even planes from other countries. right now, the u.s. has about five warships in that area, although the aircraft carrier, the "uss enterprise" that was in the mediterranean sea has now left. left earlier this week and now out in the arabian sea. there has been, within the u.s., a real debate about this no-fly zone primarily on two fronts. one says the u.s. waited much too long. in fact, th
shows one of the first tomahawk cruise missiled launched from a u.s. war ship yesterday. french fighter jets struck first. the u.s. military says more than 20 targets have been hit, clearing the way for air patrols to ground libya's air force. speaking from brazil yesterday, president obama said the operation is needed to help protect libyan civilians from supporters of the regime. >> i want the american people to know, the use of force is not our first choice, but we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells is his people there will be no mercy. >> in a statement this morning, mr. gadhafi said he is quote prepared to die for his people. >>> time now is 7:10. an unbelievable rescue as the death toll climbs, a hopeful design that survivers are still out there in japan. >>> an international superstar who once hoped to be haiti's next president is shot overnight. >>> let's take a look outside. the roads are still wet. it has been a busy night overnight, and we're going to talk live with the chp, next. >>> good morning to you, giving you a look at somersault this morning. southwesterlies 10
at no expense to the u.s. taxpayer. this bill, which passed the house by voice vote last congress, commemorates the creation of a unique form of service that creates peace through people-to-people diplomacy. it doesn't cost the taxpayers a single pennyism urge my congressional colleagues to honor america's commitment to peace by having swift passage of this timely legislation. today as we mark this significant milestone in america's history, i urge each of you to join me in honoring your constituents who have served in and are supporting the peace corps funding so that we can usher in the next generation of americans who want to serve this country. i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy. mr. murphy: mr. speaker, currently u.s. families spend about $1 billion per day on imported oil. we import about 1.6 billion barrels from politically unstable nations with corresponding instability in prices. which influence our dollars, our economy, and sometimes our soldiers having to look at defending these areas. now,
of 2011. last month's "u.s.a."/gallup poll, 72% of americans favor congressional action this year to bring our troops home from afghanistan. this week, the rasmussen report finds that 52% of voters want our troops home from afghanistan this year. and to quote this poll, a majority of voters for the first time support an immediate withdrawal of all u.s. troops from afghanistan or the creation of a timetable to bring them all home within a year. 14 months ago i asked a retired military general to advise me on afghanistan. i have asked him for his thoughts, and i will read some of them to you. back in november i emailed this general and i said, what do you think about the possibilities of being in afghanistan for four more years? and, mr. speaker, i am going to read his quote. i do not believe that 40 more years would guarantee victory, whatever that is. the war is costing money and lives all in short supply. mr. speaker, there's a retired lieutenant colonel in jacksonville, north carolina, which is in my district. he served in the united states marine corps for 31 years. his name is dennis a
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more than 200 people including 189 americans died in the lockerbie bombing reports that moammar gadhafi may have ordered the attack, sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. receive any bernstein's husband was on the flight. >> we have chosen to look the other way because of business interests, because for some reason we thought we could bring gadhafi into the family of civilized nations. we now know how wrong
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
floated by officials to make us screen all letters that are being sent by the u.s. postal service. something like that would drive up the cost of security immensely so that's a way that you can really mess with the system even without executing a successful attack. >> david ross, thanks so much for your insightful analysis. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> i hope you're wrong. meanwhile, gretchen, steve, what do you got? >> thank you very much for asking. >> the orca that killed a trainer is back in action. he was greeted with wild applause. is this really a bad idea? a man who trained those animals says that animal could kill again and will. he'll join us. >> president obama wants us to all go green. take a look at what happened in one state when they tried to do it. yes, those are 3 x 5 foot solar panels on the street. the story coming up next. [ male announcer ] at e-trade, investing means taking action with professional-grade research. and some of the most powerful, yet easy to use trading tools on the planet. it's investing with intelligence and cold hard conviction. e-trad
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
the u.s. treasury and department of housing and urban development for combating foreclosure and programs and has been a costly failure. headlines around the country agree, a recent "washington times" article said that obama helping hard -- obama's hand -- obama's helping hand hoodwinks homeowners. mortgage assistance can be worse than nothing. we must help programs that have hurt so many homeowners. unfortunately, programs like hamp were set up in haste and have done little to restore stability in the market. we need to stop funding programs that don't work with money that we don'thave. out-of-control federal spending is hurting our economic recovery. our nation faces a $14.2 trillion national debt and economists agree that reducing government spending will create more favorable environment for private sector job growth. that's exactly what unemployed americans and homeowners need, a ob and a paycheck, not a handout or other fail government program. i reserve the balance of my time. . the chair: the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. frank is recognized. mr. frank: i yield three minutes t
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)